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Dandi Memorial drawing by Artist Alexander Devasia (2013)

The 'National Salt Satyagraha Memorial', Dandi, Gujarat, India is conceived as an experiential journey recreating the spirit and the energy of the 1930 Dandi March led by Mahatma Gandhi and 80 of his fellow Satyagrahis, taking the visitors to the Monument step-by-step in order to visualise and understand the history of the historic Salt March and the methodology of Satyagraha, which finally led to India’s Independence from the British colonial rule. This project, endorsed by the Ministry of Culture, Government of India is advised by a High Level Dandi Memorial Committee (HLDMC) with IIT Bombay as a Design Coordination Agency.

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Dandi Memorial

National Salt Satyagraha Memorial (NSSM) Project,
Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Powai,
Mumbai 400 076, Maharashtra, India.

Artist's Vision of National Salt Satyagraha Memorial, Dandi, Gujarat, India.
Artist's Vision of National Salt Satyagraha Memorial, Dandi, Gujarat, India.

The Spirit of Dandi

The Salt Satyagraha March or The Dandi March of 1930 as it is popularly known, was a landmark in the history of Indian freedom struggle. As a part of the Civil Disobedience Movement against the British rule, 80 Satyagrahis led by Mahatma Gandhi marched 241-miles from Sabarmati Ashram, Ahmedabad to the coastal village of Dandi and broke the Salt Law imposed by the British. As was the symbolic nature of the event, it inspired millions of Indians to join the freedom struggle and brought worldwide attention to the movement. The Dandi March demonstrated the effectiveness of non-violent civil disobedience as a form of protest for the first time.

Right from the time when the Prime Minister of India approved the Dandi Memorial Project in 2005, a multitude of people from all walks of life endured whole hearted passion, dedication and hard work to make this project a reality. A High Level Dandi Memorial Committee (HLDMC) was constituted under the leadership of Gopal Krishna Gandhi, grandson of the Mahatma Gandhi to oversee the project. IIT Bombay was later assigned the task of conceptual design, coordination and implementation of the project. Different departments of IIT Bombay conceptualised various elements of the memorial including the memorial structure, the statues and murals, the artificial lake and the solar panels used for generating clean energy.

“Dandi March remains a watershed moment in our history. Tributes to all patriots who joined the March, inspired by Mahatma Gandhi's leadership. He is a global citizen, identity of an era. Gandhi is a legacy of human-centric development and a source of an unending power of the unfailing weapon of non-violence.”
- Narendra Modi,
Hon’ble Prime Minister of India

“Gandhiji's message of self-reliance and self-respect is best symbolised by the Dandi March. It was a message of standing on one's own feet, and then dealing with the world with confidence and self-assurance.”
- Dr Manmohan Singh,
Former Prime Minister of India
while commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Dandi March in 2005

“A lot of the facts of the historic Salt March were being forgotten and a lot of myths were creeping into the narrative. We intend to serve the unadulterated facts of the event to the future generations. It is also important that the memory of the 80 marchers along with that of Mahatma Gandhi is enshrined and immortalised. It was also realised that a lot was forgotten about the original route taken by the Marchers. With the Government of India declaring the path taken by the marchers as a historic heritage route, we intend to conserve it as close to the original path as possible. Let Mahatma Gandhi's quest for world sympathy in the battle of right verses might be remembered forever.”
- Tushar Gandhi,
High Level Dandi Memorial Committee (HLDMC)

Watch "Celebrating the Spirit of Dandi March"

Bamboo Studio designed by Prof Kirti K Trivedi of IIT-B for Dandi Memorial Project Statues Workshops (2013)
Bamboo Studio designed by Prof Kirti K Trivedi of IIT-B for Dandi Memorial Project Statues Workshops (2013)

National Salt Satyagraha Memorial
Location: Navsari District, Gujarat, India.

National Salt Satyagraha Memorial at Dandi, Navsari is connected by NH228 also known as Sabarmati-Dandi Highway. Navsari, the nearest town to Dandi is located in southern Gujarat and is situated near River Purna, within a few kilometres of the river's delta, which is west of the city and joins the Gulf of Khambhat.

The weather in Navsari is sunny from September to May. Monsoon is usually from June to August. The average maximum and minimum temperatures are 40°C (104°F) and 18°C (64°F) respectively. The average annual rainfall is 122 cm (48 in).

Nearest railway station is: Navsari. The nearest domestic airport is Surat, 30 km north of Navsari, with the nearest international airports being Chhatrapati Shivaji International Airport in Mumbai, 230 km to the south.

The Technology

The indigenous technology used at the National Salt Satyagraha Memorial, Dandi, Gujarat is researched and developed by different departments of IIT Bombay, the design coordination agency. They worked together internally and with each other to design and coordinate the execution of the technologies used in the memorial complex. It makes this a first of its kind project for the premier institute. Different technology components include:

The A-Frame: Stylised hands raised up in the sky, holding at the top a simulated salt crystal to form the canopy
The A-Frame: Stylised hands raised up in the sky, holding at the top a simulated salt crystal to form the canopy

The Monument

The monument is a 40 feet tall steel A-frame with a 2 and half tonne weighing glass crystal placed at the top. The coastal topography of the area meant that its structure had to be wind tunnel tested. The structure was also wielded with non-corrosive material like duplex steel to ensure its durability. Another unique feature is the laser lights which rises up and illuminates the glass crystal at night to make it a visually enhancing experience.

A statue of Gandhiji inside a pyramid of light, followed by life-size sculptures of the group of the 80 fellow marchers will be the main memorial. Two stylised hands raised up in the sky, holding at the top a handful of simulated salt crystals, will form the canopy under which the main Gandhiji sculpture would be placed. The hands would have solar panels mounted within them with a bank of LED search lights floor mounted around the rim of the base pedestal. With light levels going down towards evening, a pyramid of light will rise up in the sky illuminating the salt crystal at the apex.

Solar Trees

To reflect the ethos of self-sufficiency imbibed by Mahatma Gandhi, 40 Solar Trees where designed, developed and installed. It makes this memorial a net zero-energy project where all the energy required is produced in the memorial itself. It produces energy during the day and exports the extra energy to the electricity grid. During the night, it imports the energy required back from the grid. This system makes ensures the availability of electricity without the need to install and maintain expensive batteries.

Artificial Lake

An artificial lake was created to symbolise the sea shore aspect of the Salt Satyagraha. It is a non-permeable, geo textile based lake which is sealed from the bottom and top to prevent salt infiltration. Locally available non-corrosive materials where sourced to construct the artificial lake at the National Salt Satyagraha Memorial. The lake is filled with harvested rain water which is then treated to produce sparkling clear.

Solar Salt-Making Pans

Solar Salt-Making Pans will be installed at the Memorial Complex to allow visitors to personally experience salt-making and to make a pinch of salt to be taken away as a memory of the visit to the Memorial. The activity helps to understand Gandhi’s call to everyone to make their own salt. The facility enables visitors to make a pinch of salt, that can be taken away as a memory of the visit to the Memorial. The activity celebrates the strategic brilliance of the Mahatma,who used the powerful metaphor of salt to lead use towards independence.

3-D rendering of Solar Salt Making Pans as designed by IIT-B

Civil Structures

Based on the soil data and topography, the ground level raised by two meters and the site made suitable for statue, bridge and other structures. All civil structures was analysed and designed by IIT Bombay. The civil structures also warranted the use of non-corrosive material and wind tunnel testing. Even minute aspects like selection of rocks for the landscape was handled carefully by the Design Team.

24-Mural Narrative Pedestal as designed by IIT-B

E-Guided Tour

IIT Bombay is working closely with experts to develop a 60 minute immersive audio tour so that the visual experience of 24 Mural Narratives is enhanced and the visitors of National Salt Satyagraha Memorial have a more holistic experience of the history of the event. At the Dandi Memorial Complex, smart phones are converted into an in-destination personal tour guide enabled by the use an interactive mobile application.

The 5-metre high Mahatma Gandhi statue by artist Sadashiv Sathe

The Dandi Gandhi Statue
by Sadashiv Sathe

The main statue of Mahatma Gandhi for the Salt Satyagraha Memorial complex, Dandi, Gujarat is sculpted by Sadashiv Sathe, one of the most renowned Sculptors from India. The 5-metre high statue of the Mahatma projects the forceful forward march of a great leader leading the people to freedom from exploitation and injustice.

Sadashiv Sathe, who made the first Mahatma Gandhi statue installed in Delhi in 1952, had this to say when asked about his Gandhi statue made for National Salt Satyagraha Memorial: “When I visualise Mahatma Gandhi in the form of a sculpture, I suggest all his qualities besides the physical form of the personality, namely his intrepid Satyagrahi; his firm belief in truth; his vision; ideals and a strong-will to go for justice. His face looks forward with greater firmness, full of resolve to break the fetters of British rule. The broad stole that is draped on his shoulders and covers his slender frame as seen by his followers suggests the enormous form that his movement of civil disobedience is destined to assume in the near future.”

"Sculpture in Form and Spirit"

by Sadashiv Sathe

 
The 5-metre high Mahatma Gandhi statue by artist Sadashiv Sathe

2013 Dandi Sculpture Workshops

In 2013, an open call for professional sculptors and students of sculpture was announced and from the several entries, 40 sculptors were selected from India, Austria, Bulgaria, Burma, Japan, Sri Lanka, Tibet, UK, and USA. Selected sculptors were invited to the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) campus in Mumbai for two workshops held in November and December 2013 and each of them created clay sculptures of Salt Marchers. The sculptors had the liberty to follow their individual approaches and visual coherence was ensured with the guidelines of eminent Indian sculptor Sadashiv Sathe. Prominent Gandhians and scholars were invited to share their understanding of the 1930 Salt Satyagraha. Films, photographs and documentary references helped sculptors capture the spirit and determination of the 80 marchers who accompanied Gandhi.

Artist Johanna Schwaiger from Austria working on her Salt Marcher statue at IIT-B (Dec 2013)

Dandi Sculptures Workshop I

November 7-24, 2013

In 2013, an open call for professional sculptors and students of sculpture was announced and from the several entries, 40 sculptors were selected from India, Austria, Bulgaria, Burma, Japan, Sri Lanka, Tibet, UK, and USA. Selected sculptors were invited to the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) campus in Mumbai for two workshops held in November and December 2013 and each of them created clay sculptures of Salt Marchers. The sculptors had the liberty to follow their individual approaches and visual coherence was ensured with the guidelines of eminent Indian sculptor Sadashiv Sathe. Prominent Gandhians and scholars were invited to share their understanding of the 1930 Salt Satyagraha. Films, photographs and documentary references helped sculptors capture the spirit and determination of the 80 marchers who accompanied Gandhi.

List of Dandi Sculptors

Abhishek Mandala India; Awdhesh Tamrakar India; Chowki Srinivas India; Deepshikha India; Jaydeep Apte India; Kantilal Parmar India; Komari Ranganadh India; Krunal Kahar India; Kunal N Lende India; Mrunal Kahar India; N Nandaraj Singh India; Prasanna R Gogilwar India; Punam Sarsecha India; Ram Dashrath Kumbhar India; Ramesh Junapudi India; Ravi Chandra Katuri India; Suryanarayana Veeravasarapu India; Vaibhav More India; Yogesh Lokhande India.

Resource People

Antony Ben India; Jayan VK India; Shanti Swaroopini India; Prashant Sharma India; Siddharth Sathe India.

IIT-B Organising Team

Prof Kirti K Trivedi (Convenor)
Prof Juzer Vasi
Prof Venkataramani N
Sethu Das (Coordinator)


Dandi Sculptures Workshop II

December 7-22, 2013

In 2013, an open call for professional sculptors and students of sculpture was announced and from the several entries, 40 sculptors were selected from India, Austria, Bulgaria, Burma, Japan, Sri Lanka, Tibet, UK, and USA. Selected sculptors were invited to the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) campus in Mumbai for two workshops held in November and December 2013 and each of them created clay sculptures of Salt Marchers. The sculptors had the liberty to follow their individual approaches and visual coherence was ensured with the guidelines of eminent Indian sculptor Sadashiv Sathe. Prominent Gandhians and scholars were invited to share their understanding of the 1930 Salt Satyagraha. Films, photographs and documentary references helped sculptors capture the spirit and determination of the 80 marchers who accompanied Gandhi.

List of Dandi Sculptors

Atsuro Seto Japan; Derrick Maddox USA; Emil Danailov Popov Bulgaria; Gavin Fulcher United Kingdom; Johanna Schwaiger Austria; Lobey Jangchup Tibet; Manoranjana Herath Bandara HM Sri Lanka; Suu Myint Thein Burma; Thupten Tsering Tibet; Ajayan V Kattungal India; Debashish Bera, Midnapur India; JSP Govind Raju N India; Niharika Manchanda India; Pulkit Jawa India; Rajesh Chinthada India; Santosh Kumar Pedagadi India; Subrata Das India; Sumit Sarkar India; Sunil Sridhar India; Uday Kumar Tekam India; Prashant Sharma India.

Resource People

Alex Chandy India; Krishna Goswami India; Narayan Sutradhar Prof India; Prashant Sharma India; Siddharth Sathe India.

IIT-B Organising Team

Prof Kirti K Trivedi (Convenor)
Prof Juzer Vasi
Prof Venkataramani N
Sethu Das (Coordinator)

24 Narrative Murals

Various events and stories from the historic 1930 Salt March are depicted through 24-Narrative Murals along a paved pathway at the National Salt Satyagraha Memorial complex at Dandi, Gujarat. The initial conceptualisation for the murals was done at IIT Bombay and Clayfingers Pottery at Urakam, Kerala. The final creation of 24 Murals in deep relief was done by a team of experienced sculptors led by Shanthi Swaroopini from the Jawaharlal Nehru Architecture and Fine Arts University (JNAFAU), Hyderabad with the guidance of IIT Bombay and High Level Dandi Memorial Committee (HLDMC).

Identity: National Salt Satyagraha Memorial

The Visual Identity for the National Salt Satyagraha Memorial is a simple yet a powerful depiction of what it stands for. The Design is developed by C-Wing, a Mumbai-based design firm in consultation with IDC School of Design, IIT Bombay. 80 dusty brown dots making a striking use of positive and negative space in a circular formation represent the 80 Salt Satyagrahis of the 1930 Salt March and the 241-mile long dusty road they covered. All the dots seem to emanate from a centre. This centre, which is a circle of nothingness, holds the formation of the 80 together. This circle symbolises the guiding light, stands for Mahatma Gandhi, the unifying force. In this simple evocative way, the story of Mahatma Gandhi’s Salt Satyagraha with the 80 Marchers is conveyed in a manner that is easy to understand. Interestingly the identity also follows the principle of a Mandala, a symbol that forms the basis of all traditional Indian Design.

Public gathering with Mahatma Gandhi at Chakla, Baruch, Gujarat during 1930 Salt March
Public gathering with Mahatma Gandhi at Chakla, Baruch, Gujarat during 1930 Salt March

1930 Salt March: Historical Background

The Salt Tax has had a long and an ‘ugly’ history. From the very start of the rule of the East India Company in India, it was considered to be a good source of income. At first, this tax was imposed in the form of ‘land rent’ and ‘transit charges’, and in 1762, it was consolidated into ‘duty’. Then India, in particular Bengal and its surrounding provinces were, in turn, rendered dependent upon imported salt from Liverpool and elsewhere. Oppressed with the burden of extravagant charges, the indigenous industry soon found itself unable to compete with its English rival which was making determined efforts to capture the market. With passage of time, a duty upto 3 rupees or even more per maund, or 4 to 6 times the basic price of salt manufacture, was levied on salt manufactured in Bengal, and also on salt obtained from other Indian states.

Salt was a basic necessity of common people. The tax/duties on the annual requirement of a family amounted at one time up to nearly two months’ wages of a labourer. Organised opposition to it was voiced from the very inception of the Indian National Congress in 1885. Nationalist leaders such as Dadabhai Naoroji and GK Gokhale had particularly raised their voice against it.

Gandhiji had started expressing his strong opposition to such oppressive duties on common salt right from his student days in London. No wonder, he selected Satyagraha against salt taxes as the key issue in 1930 while leading the civil disobedience movement for India’s freedom from the British colonial rule.

Joan V Bondurant has aptly described the ‘objectives’ of Gandhiji’s Salt Satyagraha as:

“(1) Immediate: Removal of Salt Acts. . . . Revenue realised from the Salt Tax amounted at this time to $25,000,000 out of a total revenue of about $800,000,000. These laws were held to work a hardship on the people, especially the poor, and to constitute the taxation of a necessity.

(2) Long Range: The Salt Acts were chosen by Gandhi for contravention in a general civil disobedience movement because they not only appeared to be basically unjust in themselves, but also because they symbolised an unpopular, unrepresentative, and alien government. The ultimate objective of the civil disobedience was complete independence.”

Prepared by YP Anand, Former Director of National Gandhi Museum, New Delhi & Former Chairman of Railway Board, Government of India. He is also a Member of High Level Dandi Memorial Committee (HLDMC)

Numerous sources have been located as references for the preparation of this document, the two primary sources being, ‘Indian taxation Enquiry Committee Report, 1924-25, published by Govt of India (1926)’ and ‘Monograph on Common Salt’, published by FICCI (1930), the latter having been studied by Gandhi also while he decided to take up ‘Salt Satyagraha’ for attaining Poorna Swaraj.

List of Salt Marchers

Salt Satyagrahis at Sabarmati Ashram, Ahmedabad, Gujarat on March 12, 1930 at 6:30am.

1930 Salt March Documentary

"The Great Salt March"
(1985 Films Division Documentary)
Director : Prem Vaidya
Producer : Films Division
Format : B/W
Language : English
Year : 1985
Run-time : 21 min

Watch

Purchase

The historic 1930 Salt March led by Mahatma Gandhi
The historic 1930 Salt March led by Mahatma Gandhi

"HInd Swaraj or Indian Home Rule"
by MK Gandhi

"National Salt Satyagraha Memorial:
Project Brochure"

"Salt March: The Historical Background"
by YP Anand

Team National Salt Satyagraha Memorial love to hear from you! Use the form below to send us your comments/feedback/criticism. We read all feedback carefully, review and respond if you provide your email ID. We may contact you for a better understand the comments you submitted. You may join our active online community and share your experiences, your passion for art and history.

Gratitude!

"National Salt Satyagraha Memorial, Dandi" has been an ambitious project, which would not have been possible without the collaborated support and hard work of many individuals and institutions and hundreds of individual volunteers from worldwide who put in so much enthusiasm and effort to make this possible. We thank each one of them for their faith in this project.

High Level Dandi Memorial Committee

Dina Patel, Dr Sudarshan Iyengar, Tushar Gandhi, Dr YP Anand.

Team IIT-Bombay

Anil Kulkarni (Prof). Chakravarthy BK (Prof). Devang Khakhar (Prof). Juzer Vasi (Prof). Kirti Trivedi (Prof). Mazhar Kamran (Prof). Prakash Nair. Raja Mohanty (Prof). Raja VS (Prof). Sethu Das. Shilpa Ranade (Prof). Shyam R Asolekar (Prof). Singh TN (Prof). Sreekumar GV (Prof). Tapanendu Kundu (Prof). Venkataramani N (Prof). Viswanadham BVS (Prof). Yogesh M Desai (Prof).

List of Dandi Sculptors (November 2013)

Abhishek Mandala, Vishakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh. Awdhesh Tamrakar, Shahgarh, Madhya Pradesh. Chowki Srinivas, Sircilla, Andhra Pradesh. Deepshikha, Ranchi, Jharkhand. Jaydeep Apte, Kalyan, Maharashtra. Kantilal Parmar, Baroda, Gujarat. Komari Ranganadh, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh. Krunal Kahar, Baroda, Gujarat. Kunal N Lende, Thane, Maharashtra. Mrunal Kahar, Baroda, Gujarat. Nandaraj Singh N, Thoubal, Manipur. Prasanna R Gogilwar, Thane, Maharashtra. Punam Sarsecha, Baroda, Gujarat. Ram Dashrath Kumbhar, Mumbai, Maharashtra. Ramesh Junapudi, Secunderabad, Andhra Pradesh. Ravi Chandra Katuri, Tenali, Andhra Pradesh. Suryanarayana Veeravasarapu, Andhra Pradesh. Vaibhav More, Mumbai, Maharashtra. Yogesh Lokhande, Mumbai, Maharashtra.

List of Dandi Sculptors (December 2013)

Atsuro Seto, Japan. Derrick Maddox, USA. Emil Danailov Popov, Bulgaria. Gavin Fulcher, United Kingdom. Johanna Schwaiger, Austria. Lobey Jangchup, Tibet. Manoranjana Herath Bandara HM, Sri Lanka. Suu Myint Thein, Burma. Thupten Tsering, Tibet. Ajayan V Kattungal, Alappuzha, Kerala. Debashish Bera, Midnapur, West Bengal. JSP Govind Raju N, Andhra Pradesh. Niharika Manchanda, Delhi. Pulkit Jawa, Delhi. Rajesh Chinthada, Andhra Pradesh. Santosh Kumar Pedagadi, Andhra Pradesh. Subrata Das, West Bengal. Sumit Sarkar, West Bengal. Sunil Sridhar, Surat, Gujarat. Uday Kumar Tekam, Delhi.

Resource People

Alex Chandy, Kochi, Kerala. Krishna Goswami, Assam. Narayan Sutradhar Prof, Bangalore, Karnataka. Prashant Sharma, Faridabad, Haryana. Siddharth Sathe, Kalyan, Maharashtra. Antony Ben, Kollam, Kerala. Jayan VK, Tripunithura, Ernakulam, Kerala. Shanti Swaroopini, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh.

Others

Prof Abhimanyu, New Delhi. Aniket Bhagat, Mumbai. Aditi Phukan, Bangalore. Ajay Kulkarni, Aurangabad. Alexander Devasia, Kerala. Aparna Rao, Mumbai. Anil Kakodkar, Mumbai. Ankush Waradkar, Mumbai. Anmol Dharmadhikari, Mumbai. Bhawesh Choudhary, Pune. Biju D, Singapore. Bina Nayak, Goa. Chaman Sharma, New Delhi. Chandrasekhar Aher, Mumbai. Chirag Kalelkar, West Bengal. Dileep Sukapuram, Kerala. Diwia Thomas, Kerala. Dhirubhai Patel, Dandi, Gujarat. Ebby Sunny, Kerala. Ela Bhatt, Ahmedabad, Gujarat. Eswar Anandan, Hyderabad. Evan Theurer, Germany. Feroze Babu, Kochi, Kerala. Guruprasad Rao, Mumbai. Harshad Ainapure, Mumbai. Haseena Suresh, Dubai. Jaideep Bose, Mumbai. Jaimini Pathak, Mumbai. Jashpal Singh IPS, Vadodara, Gujarat. Kallianpur CA, Mumbai. Kalubhai Dager, Dandi, Gujarat. Karma Yeshi, Dharamshala. Katharina Jourdan, Germany. Kashyap Parikh, Vadodara, Gujarat. Keiko Sei, Thailand. Keli Ramachandran, Mumbai. Kutumbale SS, Mumbai. Kuldip Singh Tithriya, Mumbai. Mohan Sivanand, Mumbai. Mukta Ojha, Bihar. Murtaza Gandhi, Ahmedabad. Narayanbhai Desai, Gujarat. Neha Chaturvedi, Delhi. Nisha Mary Poulose, Germany. Pallavi Thakur, Mumbai. Parul Biju, Singapore. Prasad GVVSDS, Hyderabad. Prasad Kulkarni, Mumbai. Prayag Mukundan, Kerala. Prince Lakshman, Fiji. Prof Narayan C Parasuram, Mumbai. Pandit ji, Mahisana, Gujarat. Pawan Gupta, Uttarakhand. Prashant Sharma, Faridabad. Radha Bhatt, New Delhi. Radha Joshi, Mumbai. Ramanamurthy KV, Andhra Pradesh. Ramu Ramanathan, Mumbai. Rashmi Siddarthan, Bangalore. Rohit Singh, Mumbai. Sanjeev Prabhakaran, Kerala. Sanman Mandlik, Mumbai. Santosh Kangutkar, Mumbai. Sastri KVS, Mumbai. Satish Raut, Mumbai. Shantanu Yennemadi, Mumbai. Shilpa Mirpuri, Mumbai. Suku Dass, Kerala. Suresh Babu, Kerala. Suresh Jayaram, Bangalore. Suresh Subramanian, Dubai. Susmita Bharali, New Delhi. Tenzin Dhonyoe, Dharamshala. Tharanath Menon, Kerala. Thomas Titus, Bhopal. Uday Mahajan, Jalgaon. Dr Vijay Rana, USA. Prof Tara Sethia, USA. Yeldtho Mathew, Goa.

Institutions/Organisations

1Shanti Road Studio, Bangalore. Aditya Birla Foundation, New Delhi. Albert Einstein Institute, USA. ArtGen, Surat, Gujarat. Clayfingers Pottery, Urakam, Kerala. College of Fine Arts, New Delhi. Design & People, Kochi. Ezeesolve, Bangalore. Films Division, New Delhi. Friends of Tibet, Mumbai. Gandhi Peace Foundation, New Delhi. Gandhi Research Foundation, Jalgaon. Gandhi Smriti, New Delhi. Gujarat Vidyapeeth, Ahmedabad. Gyudmud Tantric University, Karnataka. Imaginarium, Mumbai. KV Ratnam & Sons, Rajahmundry, AP. National Gandhi Museum, New Delhi. Sabarmati Ashram, Ahmedabad. Shilpalay, Kalyan. SIDH, Uttarakhand. Swaraj Peeth Trust, New Delhi. Terra Crafts, Eroor, Kerala. Tibetan Government-in-Exile, Dharamshala.